Fleece-Lined Pants Tutorial & Free Pattern

The fleece flowers are a great way to use up fabric scraps – check out my other tutorial on how to make these easy peasy cute flowers! The sweater pattern is coming soon and will include bigger sizes.

As much as I’d like to hibernate on the couch under layers of blanket with with a steaming cup of coffee watching old movies all season until the trees start budding, there are just too many exciting things like Thanksgiving parades and Christmas lights in the park with nostalgic hayrides going on outside. Oklahoma’s wind can be bitingly cold so I like to keep my little ones bundled up and fleece-lined pants are a perfect part of their winter wardrobe that keep little legs all nice and warm when they are out and about. 

I used the same pattern as the flannel pants *here*. The only thing I would change when cutting from that pattern would be to add a inch or two to the crotch depending on the fabrics you are using. I used a sweater knit fabric for the outside of the pants and blizzard fleece for the inside and doubling two thick fabrics can shorten the crotch. For the waistband, I used the Sew Classic knit fabric. I’ve also included two ways to sew the elastic waistband – the casing method and another with the elastic sewn directly onto the waistband. 

If you’re ever in Yukon, OK check out Express Clydesdale Barn – friendly folks, playful ranch dogs & not to mention beautiful horses plus the self-guided tour is free!
Ok, let’s make some seriously warm pants!

Things You Will Need:
Self Fabric (I used a sweater knit fabric)
Lining (I used fleece fabric)
Knit Fabric – for the waistband
1” Knit Elastic
Ribbon – back tag, bow
Pattern *here* (Check the 1” test square. Print on 8.5”x11” Letter size paper)
This pattern is the same as the flannel pants. The only difference is, for the double layered pants add about 1”-2” to the height of the crotch because depending on the thickness of the fabrics you use, it will make the crotch shorter. I forgot to do that here so after I layered my two thick fabrics, the crotch on my pants seemed shorter. It’s more noticeable when worn over a diaper.  
*This great idea is from Leslie – “If you were to want the pants windproof as well as warm, you could choose a performance fabric such as Polartec Windpro or Polartec Power Shield and possibly reduce the thickness while achieving at least the same warmth. Often wind is what contributes to the chill factor. I’ve made super warm wind and water repellent pants layering Power Shield with lightweight Power Wool, so it’s high performance layering with fantastic results. Of course these fabrics are more expensive than store bought fleece, but they last for years and can be handed down to siblings…and I often can just use scraps left from my own outerwear sewing.” Thanks, Leslie!
You should have 4 pieces cut out which you will fold each in half and sew with a 1/4” seam allowance.
Turn one side right side out and insert it into the other side. With right sides together, pin along the U shape and then sew with a 1/4” seam allowance. 
Now you should have two pants. Turn them both inside out and mirror the two pants with the fronts on top. 
Pin the hems together and sew with a 1/4” seam allowance.
Pull up the “outer” pants over the fleece inner pants and all the seams should be sandwiched between the two pants.
Now it’s time for the waistband. Cut out the waistband 2 1/4”” by however long your pant’s waist measurement is plus 1/2” seam allowance.  Sew the ends to make a ring.
Pin the waistband and the pants right sides together and sew with a 1/4” seam allowance.
I cut my elastic 2”-2.5” shorter than the waist measurement. Madeline’s waist measures 19.5” so my elastic was 17”. I butted the ends and sewed with a wide zigzag stitch to make a ring. 
Divide the elastic ring and waistband into quarters and pin them together. 
Either sew the elastic to the edge of the waistband with the widest zigzag stitch or use a serger if you have one. Remember to not cut the elastic if you are using a serger.
Fold the elastic over. You can sew this step with a wide straight stitch but I prefer the zigzag stitch here for more stretch.  If you’re adding a back tag, do so before you fold the elastic over. The ribbon will be sandwiched within the waistband. I made a little bow out of my ribbon and hand-sewed it to the center front.
Super warm pants complete! If you end up making these cute pants, let me know how it turns out and what fabric mixture you use – I’d love to hear from you!

   

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3 Comments

  1. Thanks for taking the time to show this. If you were to want the pants windproof as well as warm, you could choose a performance fabric such as Polartec Windpro or Polartec Power Shield and possibly reduce the thickness while achieving at least the same warmth. Often wind is what contributes to the chill factor. I’ve made super warm wind and water repellent pants layering Power Shield with lightweight Power Wool, so it’s high performance layering with fantastic results. Of course these fabrics are more expensive than store bought fleece, but they last for years and can be handed down to siblings…and I often can just use scraps left from my own outerwear sewing.

    1. What a great idea! Thank you for sharing it. I will add it to the post, idea credit to you of course, so that others can try it too.

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